Seth Godin

On January 31, 2015 Seth Godin published a short blog entitled the End of Geography.  In this post he points out how companies and technologies have removed the geography barrier and that localized markets are no-longer limited to kilometers and miles.  He ends his post with, "If you are still betting on geogrpahy, on winning merely because you are local, I hope you have a special case in mind." 

On January 31, 2015 Seth Godin published a short blog entitled the End of Geography.  In this post he points out how companies and technologies have removed the geography barrier and that localized markets are no-longer limited to kilometers and miles.  He ends his post with, "If you are still betting on geogrpahy, on winning merely because you are local, I hope you have a special case in mind." 

In today's Seth Godin blog - Babies and Bath Water, he lists the organizations that he is supporting for GivingTuesday and also links to the "worst" charities.  

What makes a worst charity? 

Innovation - Finance FoxThis morning Seth Godin wrote about the charter that non-profits have to be innovators.  It is timely that this post came out; just yesterday I was chatting with a couple community investment professionals (one energy company and one media company) about their role as funders in the social innovation space and what failure looks like to them when charities cannot or are unable to deliver on what they received funding for.

Last month I started a blog post about creating a social enterprise dictionary. A discussion was started with comments coming from a variety of individuals.  Last night, over a glass of wine and some "old-fashioned" social networking with David Ian Gray, more was added to the #socent lexicon.

Michele F-GGuest Blogger: Michele Frugel-Gartner is the Executive Director Social Venture Partners Calgary. Prior to this role, Michele was employed with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and participated in Rotary Internationals Group Study Exchange to Saitama, Japan where she studied the role of philanthropy and Japanese civil society.  She received her M.A. degree in International Studies and Diplomacy at the School of Oriental and African Studies in London and is an alumna of the Asia Pacific Leadership Program at the East-West Center in Honolulu, HI.

Note about this post: Michele and I are on the planning committee of the Innovation Exchange.  This blog originally appread on the Social Finance site.  It has been reposted with permission from the author.

A year ago, I started quietly along a path to understand the legal and regulatory structures and challenges of social enterprise. It was a quest for knowledge and was parlayed into a course on public policy for nonprofits. For six months, I diligently read everything published on the topic with the hopes that my knowledge in the topic would expand and I'd be able to influence the topic. Starting out slowly and independently, I never imagined how quickly the ball would start to roll.

This morning the first blog post I read was Seth Godin's post entitled, Fear of Philanthropy.  In it he poses two questions:

  1. How much is enough when it comes to philanthropy?
  2. At what point do you decide when to walk away from an issue?

I normally don't post two blogs in one day, but I read this blog this morning and want to share it with you.  Thank you Seth for allowing me to repost this piece!  You can follow Seth Godin on Twitter @thisissethsblog.